Page 45 of 48

To all of you in Chicago thank you

Thank you to all of you in Chicago land who spent part of your week with me. I appreciate the warm reception and applause for the program. Also appreciate those of you who stayed after the program and continued the discussion of what we covered.

Advertisements

The Former President of The Ritz-Carlton Asks, “Why Aren’t All Organizations Strengths-Based?”

“If inspiring and motivating a team is the primary goal of a great leader, then talking to employees and team members about their strengths is the best way to start.”

Given this knowledge, there is no reason why all workplaces could not be strengths-based. In a global study of companies that have implemented strengths-based management practices, 90% of the groups Gallup studied had performance increases at or above the following ranges:

  • 10% to 19% increase in sales
  • 14% to 29% increase in profit
  • 3% to 7% higher customer engagement
  • 6% to 16% lower turnover (in low-turnover organizations)
  • 26% to 72% lower turnover (in high-turnover organizations)
  • 9% to 15% increase in engaged employees
  • 22% to 59% fewer safety incidents

Nonetheless, some leaders prefer to focus on weaknesses. I find that debilitating, and it consumes a huge amount of what I call negative management time because time spent trying to “fix” weaknesses almost always results in negative outcomes for the individuals and the organization.

“Everybody is a genius, but if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing it is stupid.” This rather obscure quote attributed to Albert Einstein (a true genius) exaggerates the challenge of identifying the innate qualities that each of us possesses and applying those qualities to our careers.

Given this knowledge, there is no reason why all workplaces could not be strengths-based. In a global study of companies that have implemented strengths-based management practices, 90% of the groups Gallup studied had performance increases at or above the following ranges:

  • 10% to 19% increase in sales
  • 14% to 29% increase in profit
  • 3% to 7% higher customer engagement
  • 6% to 16% lower turnover (in low-turnover organizations)
  • 26% to 72% lower turnover (in high-turnover organizations)
  • 9% to 15% increase in engaged employees
  • 22% to 59% fewer safety incidents

Nonetheless, some leaders prefer to focus on weaknesses. I find that debilitating, and it consumes a huge amount of what I call negative management time because time spent trying to “fix” weaknesses almost always results in negative outcomes for the individuals and the organization.

In fact, I would argue that trying to change our innate qualities and behaviors is a futile exercise.

Strength Based Development The Managers Role

Gallup recently conducted global research on companies that have implemented strengths-based management practices. We found that 90% of the groups studied had performance increases at or above the following ranges:

  • 10% to 19% increase in sales
  • 14% to 29% increase in profit
  • 3% to 7% higher customer engagement
  • 6% to 16% lower turnover (low-turnover organizations)
  • 26% to 72% lower turnover (high-turnover organizations)
  • 9% to 15% increase in engaged employees
  • 22% to 59% fewer safety incidentsBest Practices for Managers

    Know your own strengths. To best develop other workers’ strengths, managers first need to understand their own. No two managers are identical — and all workers, including managers, are at their best when they take a strengths-based approach to their work. Managers who play to their own strengths enhance their abilities and establish a unique management style. This practice fosters an environment where employees feel comfortable discussing their strengths and limitations: When managers are authentic and open about their own strengths, employees follow suit.