WASHINGTON, D.C. — As Americans prepare to celebrate the 125th anniversary of Labor Day on Monday, Gallup’s latest measurement on labor union membership finds that 10% of full- and part-time U.S. workers belong to a union. This marks the second year in a row of the lowest level of union membership in over 15 years: from 2003 to 2017, union workers made up an average of 13% of the American workforce.

  • Over one-third of government employees (37%) belong to a union, versus 6% of all private sector employees.
  • Workers in the South are the least likely of any U.S. region to report being part of a union, with 5% saying they belong to a union. That contrasts with 15% and 14% of workers in the East and West, respectively. In the Midwest — where organized labor and right-to-work laws have been the subject of intense political debate in recent years — 10% of workers say they are union members.
  • 14% of workers reporting an annual household income of $100,000 or more are members of a union, compared with 3% of those in households earning less than $40,000 per year.
  • Employed Americans aged 35 to 54 (13%) are more than twice as likely as those aged 18 to 34 (6%) to be members of organized labor.

Labor Union Membership Among U.S. Workers, 2018-2019Based on U.S. adults employed full or part time

Member of a unionNumber of interviews
%n
Employed U.S. adults101294
Gender
Men9800
Women12494
Age
18 to 346326
35 to 5413562
55+10388
College graduate
Yes13668
No9609
Household income
$100,000+14506
$40,000 to <$100,00011517
<$40,0003182
Race/Ethnicity
Non-Hispanic white12891
Non-white8356
Region
East15278
Midwest10262
South5447
West14307
Job type
Non-profit employee15111
Private sector employee6693
Government employee37203
Self-employed2256
Party ID
Democrat15329
Independent8551
Republican11378
Based on aggregated data from August 2018 and August 2019
GALLUP
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.